COVID-19 and the Borderlands in Africa: Some Reflections on Ghana’s Approach

In this article, published by the African Journal of Social Sciences Education, we focus on the COVID-19 and border security. Using Ghana as a case study, we argue that the policies adopted to mitigate the socioeconomic impact of COVID-19 in Ghana has rather reinforced the vulnerabilities and marginalisation of borderland populations. It is also argued that the closure of the land borders has disrupted the border economy, which sustains border populations and that the disruption of the border economy has eventually contributed to aggravating the deprivation and marginalisation of borderland populations.
We posit that securitization of border security under covid-19 and failure to engage with border people have resulted in the pursuit of policies that are befuddled with contradictions in terms of intent and results in border areas. Thus, while attempting to mitigate the socioeconomic impact on poor and marginalised people, Covid-19 policies have contributed to penetrating the evil they sort to cure in border areas.
Type of Work: 
Article
Stage: 
Published